How to deal with the logicbros: Ben Burgis' Give Them an Argument

Type
Review
Category
Politics

Anyone of a leftist disposition who spends long enough on the internet will sooner or later encounter the online figure that has come to be known as logicbro. There he is (for he’s almost always a he), accusing you of being ‘factually incorrect’, urging you to ‘get your facts straight’, and asserting that you are ‘emotionally driven and therefore prone to making sloppy mistakes’.

Logic and the Left
Moon
Type
Essay
Category
Culture

The last space waltz?

On 21 July 2011, forty-two years and one day after the Apollo 11 Moon landing, NASA’s space shuttle program – a program that had spanned three decades – concluded with the final return trip of Atlantis from the International Space Station (ISS). It felt like the end of an era – and it was.

Gender Spectrum Collection
Type
Article
Category
LGBTIQ

Transforming the law in Victoria – and what you can do to help

On 14 July 2019, the trans and gender-diverse community and our allies rallied to show support for the Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Amendment Bill 2019. If passed, the proposed law will allow trans and gender-diverse people born in Victoria to change their birth certificates to reflect their gender identity without first undergoing surgery to their reproductive organs.

Sally Rooney
Type
Article
Category
Publishing
Writing

We are all Sally Rooney

I’m a huge fan of Rooney’s work. But the things I love about her books are not the universal, the relate-able, the newsworthy. It is the way she brings her unique voice, worldview, political ideology and lived experience to the page.

Brauron
Type
Article
Category
Gender
youth

The wildness of girlhood

There is a period in many little girls’ lives, around the age of ten, where they go completely wild. Not in the sense of Girls Gone Wild, which depressingly clogs up the search results, but in the most natural sense of the word – feral and free.

Animalia_crop
Type
Review
Category
Reading

July in fiction

As wild and genre-bending and hellacious as her prose is, though, Emanuel’s novel can be placed alongside things we have read: James Joyce’s Ulysses, Samuel Beckett’s body of work, and, more locally, Jack Cox’s Dodge Rose. But while Cox’s debut was lauded in the Guardian and the Saturday Paper, described variously as exciting, original, and brilliant, critical responses to Emanuel seem strangely subdued.