Against anti-fascism: Amadeo Bordiga’s last interview

Type
Article
Category
History
Long read

An important figure in Italian and European communism, Bordiga was every bit as prominent as his friend and rival Antonio Gramsci in the decade following the Russian Revolution of 1917. As leader of the abstentionist faction of the Socialist Party, he was at the centre of the split that led to the founding of the Communist Party of Italy, of which he served as secretary while Mussolini seized power.

bordiga
spacejump
Type
Announcement
Category
Events
Subscriberthon 2017

Final day to show Overland some love

We’ll make you think, we’ll challenge you, we’ll move you – and in our pages you’ll read things you disagree with. As one subscriber wrote to us just yesterday, ‘Every now and then I want to throw Overland across the room – which I consider a brilliant thing.’

Yes legs
Type
Polemic
Category
Activism
LGBTQI

Marriage Equality: the victory and the aftermath

At my sister’s twenty-first a few weeks ago, right in the middle of the postal survey, my cousin sat beside me and asked, ‘Have you voted yet?’ He must have known where I stood on the question: I’ve spent this year travelling to different university campuses around the country launching the yes campaign, running enrolment stalls, and building on-campus demonstrations.

14733497546_feca507bf1_z
Type
Reflection
Category
Editing
Writing

What we talk about when we talk about editing

This is very resonant with fiction for me, and something I think many writers neglect to consider deeply: what shape is your story, and why is it made this way? I often reread Ursula Le Guin’s essay, ‘The carrier bag theory of fiction’, which talks about the issue of narrative form as a radical project – and the idea of using the story as a container for something.

syd
Type
Review
Category
Reading
The city

Vanessa Berry’s Mirror Sydney: An Atlas of Reflections

In this book we are shown perspectives of lesser-known places on Sydney’s suburban fringes such as Hornsby, Warragamba and Turramurra; sleepy shopping arcades in Penrith; an abandoned theme park in Lansvale and a 1970s floating restaurant slowly disintegrating in Snails Bay. What emerges in these deftly observed urban essays is far more than a simple description of urban space and reminiscence.

Priscilla crop
Type
Reflection
Category
Culture
LGBTQI

After Priscilla

Darl. My boyfriend says ‘darl’ a lot. He’s older than me. In his 40s. Twice my age, in fact. He jokes about us getting married and he flutters his eyelids and I say by the time this vote is over, you’ll probably be dead, and I accept his proposal. To him, Priscilla acts as a marker for how his life, and the lives of the queer people around him, changed. His life can be divided neatly into periods of ‘before Priscilla’ and ‘after Priscilla’.

riffraff
Type
Article
Category
Long read
Misogyny
Music

Why do we love to sing murder ballads? Tradition, feminism and bluegrass

Songs about misogynistic murder, if sung by mainstream country artists, might be construed as indicative of the harsh patriarchal world of rural Australia. To the contrary, urban alt-country or bluegrass artists can afford to try on the persona of the violent male without any ramifications, and indeed, can accrue symbolic capital through their embrace of a song form considered gothic or edgy.

manus
Type
Article
Category
Diary
Refugee rights

A story of my 1516th day

Around 2 o’clock I join a peaceful protest walk. It is the eighty-seventh day of peaceful protest. Men are holding banners and cards with different slogans on them, like ‘Four years are enough’, ‘PNG is not safe for us’, and ‘Safety is everyone’s human right.’ The main purpose of the protest is to let people know that we don’t want to be resettled in Papua New Guinea. We are also asking for an end to this indefinite detention.

4ZZZ studio
Type
Reflection
Category
Culture

Every Saturday at one: on 4ZZZ’s SoulJah Sistars

Every Saturday at one, we are fiercer, braver, stronger. We fade down the Go-betweens track the show before us, ‘Brisbane-line’, has used as their outro. We play soundbites of our SoulJah Sistars: Nina Simone, Betty Davis, Marlena Shaw, Koko Taylor, Rosetta Tharpe, Aunty Ruby, Aunty Wilma Redding, Aunty Ila Watson, Aunty Mary Graham, Rita Marley, Maya Angelou, Angela Davis, Toni Morrison and Rosa Parks. Women who shape the world as we see it.

DNwk2zJU8AAoScw
Type
Polemic
Category
Refugee rights

Manus Island: building on the outrage

The crisis on Manus Island is a challenge to all of us. What can we do? The ALP offers no alternative. Both major parties support boat turn-backs and offshore processing with no resettlement in Australia for people who come by boat. The only differences between the two parties relates to Temporary Protection Visas (the ALP will abolish them) and the size of the humanitarian intake (the ALP will increase it).

redial
Type
Article
Category
Activism
Feminism

#MeToo, but now what?

What started as a trickle of hashtags, a game of safety and invisibility in numbers, quickly grew to become personal, overwhelming, and eviscerating. Longer and longer posts appeared, ritual defenestrations from our hard-won rooms of our own into a world that remained silent and complicit. The gamut of responses from fellow victims alone ran from deep sympathy, love, and solidarity to complete and utter standstill (switching off modems at the wall and burying phones under concrete slabs). I was firmly in the latter camp.

Spider own_original illustration
Type
Article
Category
Subscriberthon 2017
Writing

The chance to edit Frank Moorhouse

‘Spider Town’, Frank Moorhouse’s first published short story, appeared in Overland #29, autumn 1964. We’ve rescued it from the archives, because Frank is keen for it to find new audiences, and also because there is one change he wishes he could make. We’ve given him the opportunity here, by republishing the story below, along with his marked-up correction.

We’re also giving readers the opportunity to edit the story – to tweak, comment on, alter, transform, to even create new endings and back stories.

33562984743_b2fdbca1df_z
Type
Polemic
Category
Gender

On shedding the patronym

I think about the notable women who have chosen a mononym instead (Cher, Madonna, the French author Colette), but I decide unless I want to join the millennial poets of Instagram and Tumblr, the mononym isn’t the right move for me as a writer. Even then, I learn that Colette’s mononym was inspired by her father’s surname.

I start to wonder if I am reading too much into the whole thing, then decide that I am not seeking a name that is devoid of gender, just one that feels like mine.

Waterhouse, John William, 1849-1917; The Lady of Shalott
Type
Article
Category
Art
Feminism

Art and female agency in ‘The Lady of Shalott’

Generally, women in the Victorian era were unable to make decisions for themselves or move freely in public places. The Lady is doomed to a life of imprisonment if she stays within the tower, and likewise doomed to death if she leaves. Because her free will has been taken from her, the Lady’s only activity is to weave. The origin and nature of the curse on her are mysterious, but its effects are not.

cops
Type
Article
Category
Activism
Policing

Watching the cops

It is hard to believe that the rates of incarceration of Aboriginal people are actually higher than the rates of incarceration of African Americans in the USA (2,346 per 100,000 in Australia, 1,408 per 100,000 in the US). The problems that flow from over policing are much better understood in the US, a country we like to think of as much more regressive in the quality of its policing. But Aboriginal communities and their allies can take lessons from the US in how to tackle over-policing.