Chinese & Indian Australians: queer, here and in need of Safe Schools

Type
Article
Category
Activism
LGBTQI

Even in mainstream predominantly Anglo LGBTIQ communities, sexualised racism works to situate Asian queers as both hypervisible and invisible at the same time: hypervisible through the exoticisation, fetishisation and sometimes stigmatisation of skin colour, (ask any Asian male who uses Grindr); invisible, because cultural identities and heritage are often relegated or not recognised as part of queer social life.

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Labor-image
Type
Reflection
Category
Politics
Reading

What we talk about when we talk about Labor

Reading these books has forced me to articulate what I talk about when I talk about Labor: a commitment to collectivism, which manifests itself in union membership; that the free market won’t solve, let alone address, inequality; and a commitment to good quality public education at every local school and a class awareness applied to all that we do.

type-letters
Type
Article
Category
Culture
Publishing

The Miles Franklin and the small press

Based purely on output, you would expect small presses to account for at least half of all longlisted, shortlisted, and winning titles for the Miles Franklin. Some might want to argue that the discrepancy is due to the fact that larger publishers are more selective and thus publish works of higher quality. Setting aside the obviously elitist presumptions of such a claim, material circumstances would suggest the opposite.

Chinese-miner2
Type
Article
Category
Culture
LGBTQI
Politics

Asian Australians against Safe Schools: a response

Last week, a petition was tabled in New South Wales Parliament calling for the Safe Schools program to be scrapped. It was presented by the Chinese-Australian community and contained over 17,000 signatures. Its main points of contention were that Safe Schools contains resources that promote a particular ideology, including gender fluidity, that is contrary to our cultural and belief system …

PotikiPatriciaGrace
Type
Review
Category
Reading

August in fiction

Grace was the first Māori woman to publish a collection of short stories in 1975. Her work melds a distinctive approach to time, space and the spiritual with the political difficulties of being Māori in a predominantly white world.