Marriage Equality: the victory and the aftermath

Type
Polemic
Category
Activism
LGBTQI

At my sister’s twenty-first a few weeks ago, right in the middle of the postal survey, my cousin sat beside me and asked, ‘Have you voted yet?’ He must have known where I stood on the question: I’ve spent this year travelling to different university campuses around the country launching the yes campaign, running enrolment stalls, and building on-campus demonstrations.

Yes legs
Space exploration
Type
Announcement
Category
Events
Subscriberthon 2017

Subscriberthon Day One: Early birds catch many prizes!

Subscriberthon 2017 is here! So many marvellous prizes to be won – and a splendid magazine to support!

Anyone who subscribes, resubscribes or donates over the next week goes into the draw to win some spectacular prizes, including holidays, bikes, Nintendos, original artworks, locally roasted coffee, wine, workshops – and piles of books and subscriptions.

syd
Type
Review
Category
Reading
The city

Vanessa Berry’s Mirror Sydney: An Atlas of Reflections

In this book we are shown perspectives of lesser-known places on Sydney’s suburban fringes such as Hornsby, Warragamba and Turramurra; sleepy shopping arcades in Penrith; an abandoned theme park in Lansvale and a 1970s floating restaurant slowly disintegrating in Snails Bay. What emerges in these deftly observed urban essays is far more than a simple description of urban space and reminiscence.

6782122170_2558aa1312_z
Type
Article
Category
Australia
Timor-Leste

Sharks and sovereignty

On 4 September, workers in Dili were busy erecting a series of congratulatory billboards – one featured a stock photo of Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop – to celebrate the conclusion of maritime boundary negotiations with Australia in The Hague. Later that day, feted leader Xanana Gusmão was paraded through the streets as he returned home from his role as head negotiator.

Waterhouse, John William, 1849-1917; The Lady of Shalott
Type
Article
Category
Art
Feminism

Art and female agency in ‘The Lady of Shalott’

Generally, women in the Victorian era were unable to make decisions for themselves or move freely in public places. The Lady is doomed to a life of imprisonment if she stays within the tower, and likewise doomed to death if she leaves. Because her free will has been taken from her, the Lady’s only activity is to weave. The origin and nature of the curse on her are mysterious, but its effects are not.