The Riace model, climate change and the social imagination

Type
Article
Category
History
Refugees

In 1998, nearly thirty years after the discovery of these ancient shipwrecks, another boat left Greece for Italy and ran aground near Riace. This time its cargo was human beings: nearly two hundred Kurdish asylum seekers whose journey had begun in northern Iraq. They walked into the town along the highway, in single file, and the people of Riace did their best to welcome them.

Riace bronzes_discovery
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Type
Announcement
Category
News

Our fiction submissions are open for one week!

We are pleased to announce that fiction submissions are open for a one-week period, from Friday 1 February until Friday 8 February, for consideration for our first edition of 2019.

Fiction for the edition will be guest edited by Evelyn Araluen and Jonathan Dunk.

rocky
Type
Article
Category
Film
Trump

Rocky and Trump

Rocky’s and Trump’s logic break down at the same point. Rather than attributing the crisis of working-class and ‘middle-American’ malaise to their genuine root causes – corporations and the government officials who do their bidding – both shift the blame onto vulnerable groups. For Trump, it’s the Mexicans, the Chinese, the faceless foreigners taking American jobs. For Stallone, it’s African Americans, who ostensibly benefitted from white-American stagnation.

Deatchscapes page
Type
Polemic
Category
Activism

Mapping deaths in custody to dismantle carceral logic

How to write in the aftermath of Invasion Day? How to write about colonialism and the carceral logic that shapes this country? How to write about the cops – the everyday street cops, the cops on horses, the Kevlar-covered cops with their weapons – and the damage they do? How to write about the jails and the detention centres and the border logic and the black sites?

nice
Type
Review
Category
Poetry

January in poetry

‘In Blakwork, Alison Whittaker literally and figuratively demonstrates the subtle – yet radical – ways in which poetry may influence perceptions, particularly with regards to the colonial romanticisation of so-called Australia. One of the ways she powerfully does this is by mimicking Dorothea Mackellar’s use of rhyme, and reveals how it creates nostalgia = settler ownership/entitlement = systematic racism.’

New work by Alison Whittaker, Lindsay Tuggle, Michael Farrell and George Mouratidis reviewed by Autumn Royal