The Chinese capitalist romance

Type
Article
Category
Economics

The idea that formed the cornerstone for much of the West’s analysis of China for the past two decades was that as China opened up its economy the political system would inevitably follow. But Beijing has never had any interest in implementing US-style neoliberalism.

stock-exchange
boats
Type
Article
Category
Politics

Monster machine

The problem is even those of us who object to these actions are ultimately affected by them. We are the ones staring into the abyss of the horrible things done in our name: the detention centres, the deaths, the sexual, mental and physical abuse, the lives scarred and hopes ruined by successive governments’ inability to ignore the votes of the least among us ­– the narrow-minded, fearful, compassionless and xenophobic. The abyss is staring back at us. It has been for some time. Each lurch toward a crueller policy response normalises something that was once horrible in the past. And something in us changes too. We might still disagree with the policies, but we are becoming desensitised.

bones
Type
Article
Category
Culture

Descended from designers

There is much contemporary designers can learn from this type of early archaeological find. It might not be immediately obvious why designers might look to archaeological theory to develop ideas of design, however, the crucial thing to recall is that archaeology is fundamentally about material culture, and as a form of anthropology has much to offer design anthropology and by extension design itself.

Ormond2011
Type
Article
Category
Feminism
Reading

Why Helen Garner was wrong

The feminists ‘consumed with rage and fear’ that Garner condemns in The First Stone are still having to be vigilant, and still cop the same criticisms she threw at them twenty years ago: that they are throwing stones when they too have sinned. Such logic implies women are equally capable of inappropriate behaviour, that we use our sexual prowess when it is convenient and should be merciful when those of the opposite gender ‘get it wrong’. Back then, I could understand the call for compassion in Garner’s argument: yes, perhaps, we don’t always have to go for the jugular.

library
Type
Article
Category
Identity

A brief history of homophobia in Dewey decimal classification

Dewey numbers for LGBTI topics have been and at times continue to be homophobic, reflecting the society and times in which the numbers are developed, from the nineteenth century to present. Melvil Dewey, a man so obsessed with efficiency he shortened the spelling of his first name and considered spelling his surname as ‘Dui’, invented Dewey decimal classification in 1876. Given the nineteenth century origins of DDC, many have noted the inherent cultural bias including a Christian concentration, racism, sexism and homophobia.